West Sea Company

8. Ship Relics

Prices in U.S. Dollars are in GREEN

 



8.39  STEERING STATION.   Early 1900’s American steamship’s steering pedestal with helm wheel.  This exceptionally handsome example is made entirely of heavy solid brass.  The distinctive “mushroom” pedestal is capped by a rudder angle indicator arrow on top sweeping an arc of 38 degrees, port and starboard from the amidships centerline “0.”  The wheel is connected to the pedestal on a fitting with bearings and grease cup, secured by a large bonze hexagonal cap nut.  The hefty all brass wheel has 8 spokes radiating to bulbous brass handles measuring 41 inches from tip to tip.  The rim of the wheel is 32 inches in diameter.  The gracefully tapered pedestal flares at the bottom to a massive deck flange 1 inch thick and 11 ½ inches in diameter.  The entire assembly measures 50 ½ inches tall as pictured.  Excellent cosmetic condition with a particularly nice, smooth high polish, showing some age spotting.   A stunning original steamship relic with a bold nautical statement.  Price Request Special PackagingBack to Top


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8.38  IDENTIFIED SHIP’s WHEEL.  Very impressive large early 1900’s ship’s wheel made by the “American Engineering Co.” of Philadelphia as marked on the inlaid brass maker’s plaque in the rim.   This massive ship’s wheel is beautifully constructed with decoratively-turned white oak spokes radiating from the hub to the scalloped mahogany rim fitted with literally hundreds of round head brass screws.  The large iron center fits a shaft with a 1 15/16 inch diameter and is equipped with a keyway for locking the fit.  Interestingly the hub is marked with applied brass plaques, on either side of the identified king spoke.  There rear “<- LEFT RUDDER” and “RIGHT RUDDER ->” respectively.  Also, just to the right of the king spoke, the rim is wood burned with the a Masonic emblem.  This unusually large and stout ship’s wheel measures 66 inches form spoke to spoke.  The rim itself is 53 ½ inches in diameter and the hub is 11 ½, weighing approximately 80 pounds.  The condition of this genuine ship’s wheel is exceptional, showing actual use but no abuse. Definitely a world class example of it genre.  Price Request Special PackagingBack to Top

 

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8.37  “U.S.N.” BELL.  Genuine mid-1900’s ship’s bell from a U.S. Navy warship.  This highest quality bell is cast of heavy silicon bell bronze and is signed and dated on the top by its maker “JOS. M. LOEFFLER CO. PHILA 1-56.”  It is boldly engraved “U.S.N.” on the front of the beautifully- polished exterior.   But even the interior of the bell and its original bronze clapper are highly polished!  It is complete with its original gracefully-arched mounting bracket with acorn nut finial.  This massive bell produces a very loud, clear tone of unbelievably long duration – a testament to its quality!  The bell itself measures 9 ¾ inches in diameter and 10 inches high inclusive of the finial.  With the bracket it measures 15 1/2 inches high overall and 14 inches from the base of the bracket to the forward protruding edge of the bell.  It weighs an impressive 19 ½ pounds.  Absolutely perfect condition in all respects.  SOLD


The Loeffler Company of Penndel, Pennsylvania has been making bells to military specifications for the U.S. Navy since 1950.



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8.35  EARLY WEST COAST TELEGRAPH.   Very Scarce late 1800’s American ship’s pilot house engine order telegraph.  This classic early steamship E.O.T., made of solid brass, is marked on the faces “DELANO BROS. S.F. CAL.”  The graceful pedestal rests atop its flared flange base measuring 11 ½ inches in diameter with six holes for mounting to the deck.  Of particular note is the double-sided turret head containing individual “windows” which indicate the “AHEAD” and “ASTERN” positions, “FULL, HALF, SLOW” and the signals “FIN’S’D WITH ENGINE, STOP, and STAND BY.”  The indications are made on hand-painted milkglass.  These are swept by red indicator needles attached to the single handle extending over both sides – as used on a single screw vessel.  The unique insulated handle is turned rosewood with a bronze cap.  Moving the handle forward and back engages the internal bell which rings with a loud clear tone upon each position change.  The turret head measures 10 ½ inches in diameter and is 5 inches wide.  The entire presentation stands 49 ½ inches tall to the top of the handle.  Excellent original condition.  There are a couple of hairlines in the internal glass which in no way affect their integrity or desirability of this rare unit.  Engine order telegraphs of this vintage, well over 100 years old, are extremely rare, particularly in such fine original condition.  This is truly a museum piece!   Price Request Special PackagingBack to To


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8.29  BUILDER’s PLAQUE.  Extremely scarce, pre-war ship builder’s plaque from the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter “NAVESINK” launched in 1934.  This heavy cast plaque is solid bronze, weighingin at a hefty 18 pounds and measuring 12 by 21 ½ inches and ¼ inch thick.  Excellent original condition with original black paint highlighting the raised letters.  A very rare pre-War U.S. Coast Guard relic.  Even rarer, being it was from a tug!  2625

The United Stated Coast Guard Cutter NAVESINK was classified as WYT 88 and given hull designation (CG-63).  She was one of four 110 foot CALUMET class tugs that entered Coast Guard service in the mid-1930’s. They were designed for light-icebreaking as well as traditional tug operations. The design proved to be so successful that it was closely followed for the subsequent three classes of tugs constructed for the Coast Guard.  Laid down at the Charleston Naval Shipyard in 1933, launched on September 28, 1934 and commissioned on January 5, 1935, NAVESINK  had  a length of 110 ½ feet, a beam of 24 feet and a draft of 12 feet and she displaced 290 tons.  At the beginning of World War II she was stationed in New York’s 3rd District but was transferred to the 5th district in Norfolk, Virginia in 1943.   Her war time compliment was 2 Warrant Officers and 14 men.  The scrappy, long-lived tugboat was decommissioned on October 30, 1968 after more than 33 years service!  Still operable, she was sold to private interests in 1970.



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8.28  SALON CARVING.   Artistically-carved plaque depicting a classic old fashioned kedge anchor intertwined with a ship’s wheel, bound by rope.  The central theme is flanked by a flowing Acanthus leaf design.  The background is embellished with literally thousands of chip carvings which appear to have been made with a traditional triangular sail needle.  All of this is “framed” in a border carved in relief.  The carving is made of solid walnut in 5 planks laminated together, later supported by 2 pine splines.  The back of the carving bears the old penciled inscription “Pass Salone” (sic).  There are 4 large old wood screws in the back which originally held this carving in place on the ship’s bulkhead.  It is now fitted with a strong picture frame wire for hanging.  1 ½ inches wide by 33 ½ inches high.  1 1/8 inches thick at the maximum and weighing 16 pounds.  Excellent original condition in the original varnished finish, noting an age crack running through the middle.  The crack is stable.  A super decorative piece with documentable ship’s history.  1275 Special PackagingBack to Top

Provenance:  Originally fitted on the SS OCEAN MONARCH, a British passenger ship built by Vickers-Armstrong in 1951.  She had a length overall of 516 feet, a breadth of 72 feet and displace 13.700 tons.  She carried 430 passengers.  When scrapped in 1964 this carving was transferred to the M/V OCEAN HAROMONY II, which was sold to Greek interests, and herself scrapped in 1979.


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8.14  YACHT PORTHOLES.  Fine, early 1900’s matched pair of heavy solid brass oval portholes.  This lovely set has thick tempered glass surrounded by a heavy brass frame opening from their tops on a single hinge and closing on the bottom with a single wing nut which secures each with a water tight fit.  These portholes are in an outstanding state of original preservation with a rich high polish.  They measure 18 ½ inches wide overall, 12 inches high and 3 inches thick.  The glass is 8 by 15 inches.  Each porthole weighs a hefty 22 pounds.  Extremely rare to find original old portholes in other than the standard circular or rectangular configuration. Price Request Special Packaging


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8.25  PILOT HOUSE BINNACLE.   Very appealing first half of the 1900’s English pattern ship’s steering compass, made in England for a Canadian distributor which offered it through a Danish ship chandler!  This diminutive navigational device has a wet card (now dry) compass with the float marked “Sestral DEAD BEAT.”  The white enameled card is marked in points of the compass down to ¼ point with the cardinal and intercardinal points identified.  North is marked by a fancy fleur-de-lis above the name “Sestrel.” The periphery of the card is calibrated in single degrees marked by 10’s.  The brass rim of the compass is signed “TRADE “Sestrel” MARK” forward.  On the “AFT” rim it is marked “R.F. Bovey Ltd Distributors Vancouver B.C.”  The compass is fully gimbaled and very lively.  The card measures 6 inches in diameter and the body of the compass 8 inches.  It is housed within its all brass hood with hinged cover and stop, glazed skylight on top and sliding door on the back.  For night viewing it is equipped with an oil burning side lamp with burner, glazed door and insulating wooden handle for lifting it out.  All perfect.  The front of the binnacle body bears a glazed bubble inclinometer marked in single degrees from 0 to 45 port and starboard.  It is signed “TRADE Sestrel MARK.”  Above it is the cast brass chandler’s label “SOLVER & SVARRER / COPENHAGEN / IVER C. WEILBACH & CO.”  The lovely tapering binnacle body is solid teak with plugged and dowelled construction.  It terminates in a heavy cast bronze base with 3 “feet” for attachment to the deck.  The pedestal body contains 2 hinged doors with locks and functional skeleton key.  These contain the magnet boxes used to compensate for the ship’s deviation.  Several magnets are still present.  There is also a slot with a thick wooden block which pulls out to reveal the healing bucket within.  This binnacle has the classic compensating spheres, technically known as “quadrantal correctors,” but colloquially called the “navigator’s balls,” indicating it was used on an iron ship.  They are painted in the traditional red and green designating port and starboard.  It stands 49 ½ inches tall to the top of the side light and measures 26 ½ inches wide at the widest on the arms, measuring 17 ½ inches in diameter on the base inclusive of one of the feet.  An extremely handsome presentation in a very manageable size compared to most of it genre.  Price Request Special PackagingBack to Top



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8.24  PILOT HOUSE PLAQUE.  Unusual relic from the helm of an early merchant ship in the form of a solid brass plaque.  This ship’s bridge sign made of heavy brass plate is engraved “<- LEFT – RUDDER – RIGHT -> / FOR STEERING FROM / PILOT HOUSE TOP / PUT RUDDER AMIDSHIPS / ENGAGE CLUTCH”.  It measures 19 ¼ inches long by 7 ¾ inches high and is 1/8th inch thick.  The incised lettering retains its original old red paint.  Excellent original condition, as taken from the ship, exhibiting good age from years at sea.  279


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8.23  BRONZE & WOOD SHIP’s WHEEL.  Authentic early 1900’s ship’s wheel constructed of especially heavy solid brass fitted with turned mahogany handles of 6-spoke design having a 1 5/8th inch I.D. center hole with key way.  The flat spokes and rim are cast in relieft with markings on both sides, “JMO.858W” and “3E.”  This stout ship’s wheel weighs an impressive 14 pounds!  The diameter of the rim is 14 inches.  The overall diameter spoke to spoke is 24 ¼ inches.  The hub is 2 ½ inches thick.  Outstanding original condition in all respects showing a great old age patina.  695 Special PackagingBack to Top


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8.22   TRIMMMETER  Genuine early 1900’s ship’s instrument used to compute the loading of cargo on early merchant ships.  This complicated device is of English manufacture and is signed on the maker’s label, “The “UNIT “ Trim Indicator PATENT John Lillie * Gillie Ltd. North Shield. No. 871.”  As the name implies, this unusual instrument showed the Chief Mate (Super Cargo) the orientation of his vessel during the loading and unloading of  freight.   As such it obviated the need for the officer to physically view the ship’s fore and aft orientation known as “trim.”  This is cleverly accomplished by the internal glass tube filled with a combination of mercury and immiscible red alcohol backed by a sliding Bakelite scale.  The scale is marked “FEET BY THE STERN” and “EVEN KEEL” divided by half foot increments from -7 to +1, and is further marked “SCALE FOR SHIP 560 FEET LONG.”  Because the tube contains mercury, it is affected by temperature.  To these ends a small mercury thermometer graces the presentation in the upper left, reading from 30 to 130 degrees Fahrenheit and signed “John Lillie & Gillie, Ltd., North shields.”  Accordingly the sliding scale can be adjusted for temperature by means of the knurled Bakelite knob on the right.  A small indicator points to the varying temperature indications on the scale, 40 – 110 F, with the notation “Set Scale To Temperature.”  This handsome ship’s relic measures 18 inches wide by 9 ¼ inches high and 2 ½ inches deep.  It is made of thick, solid teak using high quality machine-dovetailed construction.  It has 3 solid brass hanging brackets and a another brass tab of adjusting its positioning on the bulkhead of the cargo office.  On the reverse is an original typed letter of instruction with the John Lilley & Gillie, Ltd. letterhead.entitled “INSTRUCTIONS for ERECTING THE “UNIT” TRIM INDICATOR.”  “EVEN KEEL GOES AFT” meaning that the instrument was designed to be mounted on a starboard bulkhead.   895 Special PackagingBack to Top


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8.21  SAILING BOARD.  Authentic, first half of the 1900’s identified ship’s sailing board with a storied history.  This handsome example of sailor folk art consists of a hand-painted sign which was posted at the gangway, alerting the crew to the date and time of the ship’s sailing from port.  The top bears a decoratively-painted likeness of the Ben Line house flag – a red field with an anchor in the center.  Below it is boldly lettered “SS BENLOMOND / VESSEL SAILS AT [     ] HOURS / [     ] DATE [     ] / SHORE LEAVE EXPIRES AT HOURS.”  In actual practice the Mate would use chalk to fill in the blanks with the appropriate date and times.  The white lettering with powder blue edging and darker shadowing appears to be in relief and the work of a professional sign painter.  It is done on a thick grain-painted laminated wooden panel with applied molding “framing” the presentation.  The surface is original with a very desirable crusty oxidized finish.  The board measures 25 inches wide by 22 ¼ inches high and is 1 3/8 inches thick.  It still retains its original sailor-spliced lines for hanging, the left being hemp and the right cotton, which pre-date nylon or polypropylene.  The condition is excellent and original exhibiting the wear and use expected of such a genuine shipboard relic.  1295  Special PackagingBack to Top

The S.S. BENLOMOND was a steam merchant ship of 6,630 tons launched by Irvine's Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co. Ltd., Middleton Shipyard, West Hartlepool, England in 1921. 

Completed in January 1922 as CYNTHIANA for Furness, Withy & Co Ltd, Liverpool, the ship was renamed HOOSAC later that year.  In 1923 she was renamed a third time, LONDON CORPORATION, for the same owners.  In 1937 she was sold to Greek interests and received her fourth name MARIONGA J. GOULANDRIS for Goulandris Brothers of Piræus.  The following year she was sold yet again to British owners and received her fifth and final name BENLOMOND for the Ben Line Steamers (William Thomson & Co.) of Leith.

At 14:10 hours on November 23, 1942 the unescorted BENLOMOND, captained by John Maul, en route from Port Said to New York, via Capetown and Paramaribo, was struck by two torpedoes fired from U-172, under the command of Carl Emmermann.  BENLOMOND sank within 2 minutes about 750 miles east of the Amazon delta, Brazil.  The Germans questioned the survivors before leaving the area but provided no assistance.  The master, 44 crew members and eight gunners were lost.  The sole survivor, a Chinese mess steward, Poon Lim, was rescued after spending an amazing 133 days alone on a Carley raft.  He was picked up by a Brazilian fishing vessel east of Salinas which landed him at Belém, Brazil on April 8, 1943.

Obviously this board was removed from the ship at some time prior to its fateful voyage.  It is likely that since BENLOMOND began her career under this name in 1938 -- a year prior to Britain’s entry into World War II -- shore leave was most likely suspended during wartime and the sign was removed.


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8.15  18th CENTURY CHINESE ANCHOR.  Very rare, late 17th or very early 18th century anchor from a Chinese junk.  This unusual ship’s relic consists of a chiseled solid block of Granite hand-cut with an “eye” through which is rove a one-piece hand-forged iron shackle measuring an inch square in cross section.  Incredibly there are no seams and the shackle appears to have been forge-welded in horizontal layers of metal.  The granite blocks measures 6 ¾ inches long by 5 ½ inches wide and stand 7 ½ inches tall.  With its shackle the anchor is 11 inches high and weighs a hefty 25 pounds!  Surprisingly fine original condition.   A serious paperweight! Price Request Special PackagingBack to Top


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8.17  KENOTOMETER.  Very scarce, turn-of-the-last century English steamship’s vacuum gauge.   This surviving dinosaur from the engineroom of a coal-burning ship is a gauge indicating negative pressure in inches of mercury in real inches of mercury!  It consists of a complex arrangement of brass tubes, glass vials and canisters contained within a solid teak case with glazed front for viewing.   On the right is the prominent faux ivory scale marked “INCHES OF MERCURY” on the left hand scale and “PERCENT OF PERFECT VACUUM (BAROMETER = 30o) ABSOLUTE PRESSURE IN CONDENSOR,” on its right side.  The scale is adjusted using a rack and pinion system operated by a brass knurled knob on the right outside of the case.  The inlet for this gauge is mounted on the left, complete with a knurled shut off valve.  In case of spills the bottom is lined with an old fashioned blue and white hard-fired porcelain tray!  Above it the maker’s plaque reads, “KENOTOMER Brand Vacuum Gauge --->.<--- Brady & Martin Ltd. Newcastle-On-Tyne.”  The glazed front is hinged on the left, closing on the right with two brass hook and eye closures.  The top is equipped with two stout brass mounting brackets and a heavy pivoting brass handle for carrying.   The case measures 17 ½ inches high by 11 inches wide and 5 inches deep, exclusive of the exterior brass fittings.  This rare relic is in a remarkable state of original preservation given its potential fragility and the harsh working environment in which it served over 100 years ago.  It even retains its original old wavy glass!  Price Request Special PackagingBack to Top


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8.12


8.12  SMALL SHIP’s HELM.  Very scarce, the first of its type we have seen, mid 1800’s ship’s wheel complete with steering gear box.  This rare, surviving example consists of a classic pinned and dowelled 6 spoke wheel with wooden hub attached to its spindle by brass screws.  The turned spokes are of oak and the body of the wheel is mahogany.  The wheel revolves on a hand-forged inverted “V” brace in brass finish, held by a large brass acorn nut on the hub.  The hub is attached to a stout brass rod running through the gear box, supported in back by a brass bearing and cotter pin.  The internal wooden spindle, with the rod running through it, would have taken several turns of line which connected to the rudderhead by a series of pulleys.  The arched top of the mahogany steering box is reinforced with brass straps and the entire piece is in its original old finish with nicely variegated surfaces indicative of its age and sea service.  The entire presentation measures 23 ¼ inches tall overall.  The wheel is 22 inches from spoke tip to tip and 16 inches in diameter on the rim.  The steering box measures 18 inches wide and 14 ¼ inches deep from the front acorn nut to the rear support.  Excellent original condition with good signs of use and no abuse.  The wheel is nicely balanced and turns freely.  A truly rare offering.  1595


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8.02

 

8.02  WEST COAST HELM BELL.  Particularly nice 19th century sailing ship helm bell identified by maker.  This heavy, solid bronze bell is stamped on the top of the yoke on both sides “W.T. CARRATT & CO., SAN FRANCISCO.”  It is of classic 19th century form with a contoured yoke terminating in flat brass feet.  The bell is secured at the top by a lovely acorn nut finial.  The original iron clapper is secured to the inside of the bell in an unusual way – on a brass rod running across the inside top of the bell.  Attached to the clapper is the original cotton bell rope done in a seamanlike fashion with fancy knotwork terminating in a monkey’s fist.  As configured the bell stands 10 inches high and 12 inches wide.  The bell itself measures 7 ¼ inches in diameter at the mouth.  Excellent original condition with a lovely deep statuary bronze age patina.  There are numerous paint spatters indicative of a long life at sea.  A real gem of a shipboard bell from the days of sail.  895

This is the second such bell we have offered in our 35 years.  The first, offered 10 years ago, sold for the same price.

Langley’s “San Francisco Directory” for the year 1881 lists W.T. Carratt Machine and Hydraulic Works at the corner of Fremont and Natoma Streets in San Francisco.  They were manufactures of steam-related equipment.

Bunting’s "Portrait of a Port, Boston 1852-1914" depicts a nearly identical helm bell on page 346 with the caption, “June 6, 1887, The ship Panay of Salem tows down the harbor.”


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