West Sea Company

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Prices in U.S. Dollars are listed in GREEN.


 


3.18  AZIMUTH INSTRUMENT.  Genuine, highest quality ship’s navigational instrument made by the esteemed American makers, “NEGUS NEW YORK” as stamped on the bed plate and again on the maker’s tag on the box.  This precision instrument is all brass with a blackened finish.  It has an optical quality glass prism which rotates via two knurled brass knobs.  Designed to be set atop the ship’s main steering compass in a binnacle, it has a magnifier set in a tube below the prism to enhance the current compass reading while at the same time providing an image of the sun or celestial body.  Two pivoting sun shades are provided for looking at the former.  A removable “line-of-sight” pole is provided, as is a bubble level for assuring totally accurate level readings.  This instrument fits the top of a standard size 8 inch Navy magnetic compass.  It measures 9 ¼ inches long by 3 3/8 inches wide and 8 ¾ inches high with the removable vertical post.  Absolutely mint, untouched, original factory condition in its original dove-tailed wooden box with brass hardware measuring 10 1/4 by 7 ½ inches by 5 ½ inches thick. 199

Primarily used to determine LAN (Local Apparent Noon) the azimuth instrument is an effective tool for determining the ship’s latitude by measuring the sun’s altitude at the exact time of meridian passage.

The Negus firm first appeared in the New York City directories at 84 Wall Street in 1850.  Thomas Stewart was trained as a chronometer maker in England and began working with his brother, John David in 1848, first under the name of Thos. S. Negus & Co.   During the Civil War the firm moved to 100 Wall Street and the name changed to T.S. & J.D. Negus.  The business of chronometer and navigational instrument making continued to grow, causing them to move to 69 Pearl Street in 1875.   From the Civil War onward, Negus enjoyed the patronage of the U.S. Navy as the suppliers of chronometers and other navigational equipment.   By the early 1900’s T.S. & J.D. Negus had established themselves as the leading nautical instrument makers and chandler in the United States.  In 1962 the firm was purchased by Max Low & Co.  Low found success in providing the government with navigational instruments, clocks and deck watches during World War II.  Max Low’s son, Charles, continued the business in New York through the 1980’s when the firm was finally dissolved.



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5.44/22.35  WWII  U.S. NAVY BAROMETER.  Absolutely the finest quality ship’s barometer, as made for the U.S. Navy in the early 1940’s by the renown American scientific instrument firm of “FRIEZ, Baltimore” as marked on the bottom of the silvered brass dial.  Just above is the bold inscription “U.S. NAVY BuShips  (N) 3961 -- 42.”  The dial registers atmospheric pressure in inches of mercury, calibrated from 27.7 to 31.3.  This is a much broader range than most barometers of that era.   It is subdivided in 2/100th increments marked by tenths.  The reading is indicated by a thin black needle.  It is overlaid by its brass set needle moved by the knurled knob rove through the beveled Lexan crystal.  The high grade movement within has double bellows and jeweled pivots!  The needle is operated by a precision rack and pinion gear systems vs. a chain and pulley common in most barometers.  Its quality features make it extremely accurate.  This state-of-the-art weather instrument is housed in its lovely all brass case in a high polish with pivoting suspension loop at the top for hanging.  A small aperture in the rear of the case is provided for setting the reading to local conditions.  5 ¼ inches in diameter by 2 ½ inches deep.   Perfect cosmetic condition throughout.  Fully functional and very accurate!  399



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13.44   EXTRA LARGE SHIP’s BELL CLOCK.  The best!  Finest quality 8-day striking ship’s bell clock made by the prestigious Chelsea Clock Company of Boston.  This extremely handsome clock has a silvered brass dial with bold Arabic numerals and a minute chapter ring swept by black Breguet-style “moon” hands.  Between the two winding arbors it is marked “CHELSEA SHIPS BELL”.  Below the 12 is Chelsea’s early form lever Fast/Slow feature.  The original silvered brass reflector ring is present.  The massive solid brass case is hinged for easy access on the right closing on the left with a button latch.  It contains Chelsea’s all brass, high grade jeweled movement marked “CHELSEA CLOCK CO, BOSTON U.S.A.” and serial numbered 539XXX* with matching case number, dating to the latter half of 1945.  The dial measures 8 ½ inches across.  The classic flared ship’s clock case is 10 5/8 inches in diameter, 4 inches deep and weighs an impressive 23 pounds!  This clock is in virtually perfect cosmetic and functional condition.  It strikes the ship’s bell sequence properly with a loud, very pleasing tone and keeps accurate time.  Complete with original early Chelsea “butterfly” winding key, which in itself is worth $75.   An extra nice striking marine clock in close to factory new condition, over 70 years old!  Price Request Special PackagingBack to Top

* For the privacy and security of the ultimate buyer this number is being withheld.


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18.96   NAVIGATOR’s  SIGNAL LAMP.   Scarce, late 19th century American hand-held signal lamp impressed “NAVIGATORS” on the front of the hinged door.  This high quality lantern is entirely hand-made of solid brass.  It features an early hand-blown, bulbous bull’s eye lens with telltale bubbles in the glass.  The lens is seated in a hinged door secured with a spring-loaded clasp on its left.  It opens to reveal the original oil font and burner within.  The wick advance knob is marked “PATENT 1892.”  It is enclosed within a curved nickeled brass light curtain activated by a small knurled knob on the front of the lantern.  Sliding the knob in the slot allowed the user to open and close the light source for sending Morse Code!  The back of the lamp is provided with two folding wire bail handles as well as two clips for hard mounting to the ship.  Speaking to the quality of its construction, the entire bottom of the lamp is made of copper – an expensive elemental metal not subject to corrosion.  It is aspirated with numerous small vent holes, while the top has a double castellated chimney.  8 ¼ inches tall by 3 ½ inches wide and 6 inches front to back, exclusive of the handles.  Outstanding original condition in a lustrous brass polish.  Totally functional.  Guaranteed to be the best of its type available  --  A rare offering worth much more!  395

While a number of similar hand lamps were produced in the late 1800’s into the 20th century, most were  identified as being a “BOAT SIGNAL LAMP” with molded glass Freznel lenses.  This earliest version with old-style bulls eye lens and burner marked “1892” is one of the first ever made.  A real rarity that has survived in beautiful condition.


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