West Sea Company

1. Fine Art & Prints

Prices in U.S. Dollars are in GREEN



1.86  PAINTING.  Gordon Grant, American (1875-1962), watercolor on artist's paper.  This is a delightful original painting by one of America's foremost marine artists in the late 19th and early  20th centuries.  It depicts a Boston-based tug rendezvousing with a 3-masterd schooner in choppy seas.  A crewman is shown on the fantail and a cutter can be seen off  in the distance.  The painting is boldly signed lower right "Gordon Grant."  8 ½ by 16 ½ inches sight.  Professionally matted and framed under glass in a quality gilt wood frame measuring 17 by 25 inches.  The back exhibits the provenance of this painting which sold for $1,000 by West Sea Company in 1991.  Outstanding original condition.  Unlike many watercolors this painting is not faded or foxed, but has the brilliant colors and contrasts originally portrayed by the artist.  SOLD

Gordon Hope Grant was a famous American artist, best known for his maritime watercolors.  He was born in San Francisco in 1875, and died in 1962.  He produced war time posters during WW I and illustrations for many books and magazine covers including the "Saturday Evening Post" and illustrations for the BSA magazine "Boys' Life" in 1911.  He was the illustrator for "The Story of American Sailing Ships" by Charles Strong, the "Scarlet Plague" by Jack London, the "Eternal Sea" by William Williamson and many other works.  Grant was a member of the Association of American Artists.  Large numbers of Gordon Grant prints have been issued and sold throughout the years.  This is an original!


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1.84/5.15 SPANISH-AMERICAN WAR GROUPING. Three genuine historically important items directly pertaining to the war fought between the United States and Spain in 1898. They are:

  • A studio-produced photograph of Admiral Dewey, hero of the Battle of Manila Bay ,who famously ordered the command "You may fire when ready Gridley." This sepia toned image is signed lower right "Nilsen's Studio Cincinnati O." It measure 6 3/8 by 4 ¼ inches. There is a noticeable crease in the upper right hand quadrant which is now stable. The image is bright and crisp.

  • Brilliant chromolithograph boldly entitled "THE BATTLE OF MANILA." At the bottom center is the notation "Fought May 1st By Rear Admiral Dewey. Spanish Loss 11 Ships. 150 Killed. 250 Wounded. American Loss None." At the lower left is the portrait entitled "Rear Admiral Dewey." The same image as the photo offered above. The lower left is signed, "No. 1209 Copyright 1898 By Muller, Luchsinger & Co. New York." The colorful scene depicts 3 American ships and 4 Spanish vessels in the heat of battle. The image is perfect. It measures 11 ¼ by 15 ¾ inches sight. 16 by 20 inches overall. There are two tiny, inconsequential tears on the periphery and a very minor loss to the lower right corner. Condition must be rated excellent for this print over 120 years old!

  • Gentleman's pocket watch fob with a copper pendant the size of a penny bearing the same profile, embossed "HERO OF MANILA ADMIRAL GEO. DEWEY." The reverse bears the broadside of a battleship reading "DEWEY'S FLAG-SHIP OLYMPIA." It is attached to an ornate chain consisting of 11 sections, each with embossed recurring designs. The end is fitted with a typical spring-loaded necklace clasp. 13 ½ inches long overall. Excellent original condition. ALL THREE FOR 295

The explosion and sinking of the Battleship MAINE (ACR-1) in Havana Harbor on February 15th, with the loss of 260 American lives, led to America declaring war on Spain.  On April 23rd, after much Yellow Journalism and political wrangling, Congress declared that a state of war had existed between the U.S. and Spain since April 21, the day the U.S. began to blockade Cuba.  In the ensuing 10 weeks U.S. Naval and land forces thoroughly decimated the Spanish.

With resounding defeats in Cuba and the Philippines, Spain sued for peace.  Hostilities were halted on August 12, 1898, when a Protocol of Peace between the United States and Spain was signed in Washington.  The formal peace treaty was signed in Paris on December 10, 1898.  As a result of the war the United States gained all of Spain's colonies outside of Africa, including the Philippines, Guam and Puerto Rico, excepting Cuba, which became a U.S. protectorate.  These gains prompted John Hay, America's Ambassador in Britain, to refer to it as "the splendid little war," in a letter to his friend Theodore Roosevelt.  Theodore Roosevelt and George Dewey benefited greatly from their participation in the war.  Both men gained immediate fame as national heroes.  Roosevelt's fame ultimately propelled him to the White House. Years later it was determined the Battleship MAINE did not explode and sink due to hostile action, but as a result of its faulty boilers.


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1.83  SHIP's PORTRAIT.   John Henry Mohrmann, oil on canvas painting of the elegant barque VICTORIA BAY heading to sea under full sail.  This detailed painting is signed lower left "H. Mohrmann 1891."  It depicts the lovely ship departing port with the headlands in the background on the right and numerous small sailing craft in the distance.  As the ship plows through choppy seas her realistic bow wake is shown below the female figurehead and gold trailboard decoration.  The ship's name is prominent on the port bow.  The vessel flies the owner's flag "HCG" from the main mast and the ship's name pennant from the aftermast.  The British ensign flies from the spanker aft.  Mohrmann was a proficient technician who concentrated on getting all aspects of his subject 'right.'  No less than 11 crewmen are shown on deck performing their duties.  All aspects of the deck and its fittings are meticulously depicted.  The realism of the sea with frolicking seagulls and the subtle sky are a testament to this 19th century marine artist's skill. 22 ½ inches by 34 inches sight. The ornate gilded frame with contrasty black and white elements measures 28 by 39 ½ inches.  The painting has been professionally relined on its original stretcher and is in excellent condition.  Ready to hang and enjoy in a most appreciative setting. Price Request Special Packaging

John Henry Mohrmann was born in San Francisco in 1857.  At the tender age of 13 he began his life as a seaman and for the next 18 years traveled the world.  Under an Italian marine painting mentor (Luigi Roberto?)  he began his career as a ship painter in 1881.   After a very successful career as a marine painter he emigrated to Canada in 1913, where he died in 1917.  His works are well represented in a large number of prominent worldwide  museums including the Altonaer Museum, Altona Germany; Alands Sjofartsmueum, Mariehamn, Finland;  Bremen Focke-Museum, Bremen, Germany; Bartholomew Planas Collection, Majorca, Spain;  Bergen Sjofarts Museum, Bergen, Norway;  Cape Ann Historical Association, Gloucester, Massachusetts;  City of Liverpool Museum, Liverpool, England;  Mariners Museum, Newport News, Virginia;  National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, England;  Norsk Sjofartsmuseum, Oslo, Norway;   National Scheepvaartmuseum, Antwerp, Belgium;  Old Dartmouth Historical Society (New Bedford Whaling Museum), New Bedford, Massachusetts;   Peabody Museum, Peabody, Massachusetts;  San Francisco Public Library, San Francisco, California;  Sjofartsmuseet, Goteborg, Sweden, among others.  (Dorothy Brewington, "Dictionary of Marine Artists," 1982, Peabody Museum, Salem, Massachusetts.)

The iron-hulled barque VICTORIA BAY was built by Russel & Company of Glasgow, Scotland in 1885 to ply the passenger trade between Britain and Australia.


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1.82  PAINTING EARLY AMERICAN WARSHIP.  Genuine third quarter 19th century watercolor portrait of the famous steam/sail U.S. Navy ship the "UNITED STATES CORVETTE TRENTON" by listed artist James G. Maxwell 1878" as signed lower left.  This detailed broadside rendering is surprisingly bright, colorful and crisp for a painting in this medium over 140 years old!  It depicts the large fighting ship at anchor off a mountainous coast in calm seas with sails furled.  At the peak she flies the Union Jack, while streaming the long commissioning pennant from the main and the American ensign from the spanker.  This post-Civil War era gunship displays at least 9 gunports along her port side. Close inspection reveals many charming details including standing and running rigging, numerous crewmen on deck, lifeboats, gunports, accommodation ladder, davits, and her prominent single stack, among others.  The scene is entitled by the artist along the bottom legend, "United States Corvette "Trenton," 13 Guns, 3400 tons, 3180 H.P. 253L, 49B, 20.D. Bt  1876."   Water color and gouache on heavy rag paper.  10 by 6 1/4 inches sight.  Unmounted.  Perfect original condition.  775

The first USS TRENTON was a wooden-hulled screw steam/sail frigate named for Trenton, New Jersey.
She was laid down by the New York Navy Yard in 1875, launched on January 1, 1876 and commissioned on February 14, 1877.  TRENTON was the first U.S. Naval vessel to use electric lights, installed in 1883.
TRENTON departed New York on March 8, 1877 for Villefranche, France .  On March 19 RADM John Worden was embarked and she became flagship of the European Station.  A week after reaching the Mediterranean, Russia declared war on Turkey.  TRENTON and the other ships of the squadron  protected U.S. citizens and other foreign nationals in Turkey and its possessions.

In July 1878 she departed the Mediterranean to visit Portugal, France, and England before returning to the Mediterranean.   After a visit to Marseilles June 7th, the flagship departed the Mediterranean for a third time cruising to English, Belgian, and Dutch ports.  Four of TRETNON's crew rescued fellow sailors from drowning during that period, earning them the Medal of Honor.  Subsequently TRENTON sailed for the U.S. arriving at Hampton Roads on October 12, 1881.   She was decommissioned at the New York Navy Yard on November 9, 1881.

Reactivated on September 18, 1883, TRENTON departed New York in November for duty on the Asiatic Station.  Steaming via the Mediterranean, the Suez Canal, Ceylon, and Singapore, she arrived at Hong Kong on May 1st 1884 to begin two years of cruising in the Far East.  She visited ports in China, Korea, and Japan, carrying out various diplomatic missions.  On several occasions, TRENTON sent landing parties ashore in China and Korea to protect American interests during those times of unrest in China.  Completing her duties in the spring of 1886, she departed Yokohama and retraced her voyage across the Indian Ocean, via the Suez Canal and Mediterranean, then across the Atlantic reaching Hampton Roads on September 2nd.  She entered the Norfolk Navy Yard on September 9, 1886 for repairs.

On January 30, 1888, Trenton sailed for the Pacific.  The voyage took her more than a year to complete,  steaming around Cape Horn.  After stops at Panama and Tahiti, TRENTON reached Apia, Samoa, on March 10, 1889.  Six days later a typhoon struck Apia severely impacting 13 U.S. Navy ships anchored there.
TRENTON lost steam power and its rudder, rendering it in danger of foundering on the reef.  A unique maneuver suggested by TRENTON's navigator is credited with saving the ship from total destruction.   On his advice, the Captain ordered every man into the port rigging.  As the wind blew, the thick mass of bodies acted like a sail, steering the ship away from the reef and into the bay.  Even so, the TRENTON collided with the SMS OLGA and then floated toward the sinking USS VANDALIA (See our item 14.32).  With her crew still in the rigging, TRENTON's approach was slowed, avoiding yet another collision.  VANDALIA's crew abandoned their ship to deck of the TRENTON.  However both ships later sank.

Out of 450 crewmen, TRENTON lost only one life.  She was declared a total loss, and her name was struck from the Naval Vessel Register on April 13, 1891.

19th century British painter, James Scott Maxwell's work covered a narrow subject range of warships and British scenery. His paintings carried signs of immense brilliance such as in "Villefranche 1888," a drawing of a fleet of ships.  Most of his paintings were small watercolors or the modest sketches of steamers, like "Clyde," "Duchess of York," and "Ben Lomond," all carried out in small, 7 by 9 inch formats or slightly larger.
 His repertoire concentrated on seascapes, pre-World War I British seagoing steamers and men-o-war.  The works embody a form of art known popularly as "British or Continental watercolors."  The type was more or less a technical 'photo realistic' drawing, aimed at factual representation, rather than artistic creativity.  Maxwell's drawings of American steamships, such as "St. Paul" and "Haverford" are such technical sketches, which are powerful attempts at photographic realism.

 James Scott was prolific from 1875 into the early 1900s, when most of his dated sketches were produced.  The majority of his works appear to be commissions from steamship companies or the ships' crew members themselves.  Though more than 200 works are known to survive, there seems to be no variation of theme, indicating that he painted only seascapes and ships.  His geographical reach was limited to port towns of the British Isles.


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1.81  PAINTING EARLY AMERICAN WARSHIP.  Genuine late 19th century watercolor portrait of the famous steam/sail U.S. Navy ship the "UNITED STATES CRUISER CHICAGO" by listed artist James G. Maxwell 1894" as signed lower left.  This detailed broadside rendering is surprisingly bright, colorful and crisp for a painting in this medium over 125 years old!  It depicts the large fighting ship underway with sails furled, flying the embarked Vice Admiral's pennant from the fore, streaming the long commissioning pennant from the main and name pennants and American ensign from the aftermast.  This pre-dreadnaught battleship bristles with armament as she plies an azure sea, plowing ahead full, belching coal smoke and steam.  Close inspection reveals many charming details including standing and running rigging, numerous crewmen on deck, lifeboats, gunports, davits, deck guns and Union shields fore and aft, among others.  The scene is entitled on the bottom by the artist, "United States Cruiser "Chicago" 16 Guns. 4500 Tons. 5250 H.P. 325 L. 48 B. 19 D,  Bt Chester 18815 G.Q.D.L.  325 Men.  16 Knots."  Water color and gouache on heavy rag paper.  10 by 7 inches sight.  Unmounted.  Perfect original condition.  975

19th century British painter, James Scott Maxwell's work covered a narrow subject range of warships and British scenery. His paintings carried the signs of immense brilliance such as in "Villefranche 188," a drawing of a fleet of ships. Most of his paintings were small watercolors or the modest sketches of steamers, like "Clyde," "Duchess of York," and "Ben Lomond," all carried out in small, 7 by 9 inch frames or slightly larger.
  His repertoire concentrated on seascapes of pre-World War I British seagoing steamers and men-o-war. The works embody a form of art known popularly as "British or Continental watercolors." The type was more or less a technical 'photo realistic' drawing, aimed at factual representation, rather than artistic creativity. Maxwell's drawings of American steamships, such as "St. Paul" and "Haverford" are such technical sketches, which are powerful attempts at photographic realism.
  James Scott seems to have been prolific from 1875 into the early 1900s, when most of his dated sketches were produced. In addition, it seems that a majority of his works could be commissions from steamship companies or the ships' crew members themselves. Though more than 200 works are known to survive, there seems to be no variation of theme, indicating that he painted only seascapes and ships. His geographical reach was limited to port towns of the British Isles.
 

The first USS CHICAGO was a protected cruiser of the United States Navy, the largest of  three ships authorized by Congress for America's "New Navy" and one of the first steel ships in the U.S. Navy.  Launched on December 5, 1885 by Delaware River Iron Ship Building and Engine Works of Chester, Pennsylvania, commissioned April 17, 1889.  She had a displacement of 4,500 tons with an overall length of 342 feet 2 inches.  Her beam was 48 feet 3 inches and she had a draft of 19 feet.  With fourteen (!) 100 psi boilers running two compound overhead beam steam engines she produced 5,084 shaft horsepower turning twin screws to achieve a speed 16 mph.  She was bark-rigged in accordance with the plan of the "New Navy" to extend the range of newly built ships of the era, making her one of the very few in the history of the U.S. Navy to be powered by steam and sail during the very narrow window of history from the Civil War leading up to the Spanish-American War, a mere 33 years later!

In December 1889, CHICAGO departed Boston for Lisbon, Portugal to  serve in European and Mediterranean waters as the flagship of the Squadron of Evolution until May 1890, when she sailed back to New York in July.

Chicago operated along the east coasts of North and South America and in the Caribbean as flagship of the Squadron of Evolution—and later as flagship of the North Atlantic Squadron—until 1893.  After taking part in the International Naval Review in Hampton Roads in April, she left New York in June 1893 to cruise in European and Mediterranean waters as flagship of the European station.  During this period the ship was commanded by Alfred Thayer Mahan, already famous as a naval strategist.  CHICAGO returned to New York where she was placed out of commission.

Recommissioned on  December 1, 1898, CHICAGO made a short cruise in the Caribbean before sailing for the European Station in  April.  She returned to New York in September to participate in the Naval parade and Dewey celebration of October 2, 1899.  In November she sailed from New York for an extended cruise as flagship of the South Atlantic Station until early July 1901, then as flagship of the European Station.  With the squadron, she cruised in northern European, Mediterranean, and Caribbean waters until  August 1, 1903, when she proceeded to Oyster Bay, New York, and the Presidential Review of Theodore Roosevelt.

On January 1, 1905 CHICAGO relieved the armored cruiser NEW YORK as flagship of the Pacific Squadron.  For the ensuing three years she operated off the west coasts of North and South America, in the Caribbean, and to Hawaii.  In 1906 she played a key role in the evacuation of San Francisco residents during the 1906 San Francisco earthquake.  Arriving from San Diego at 6 P.M. on April 19, CHICAGO's radio allowed the city to communicate with the outside world because of downed telephone and telegraph lines. The removal of 20,000 refugees to Tiburon, Marin County was unparalleled until the historic evacuation of Dunkirk, France 34 years later.

From  January 1908 to April 1917 CHICAGO served as a training ship for the U.S. Naval Academy and the Massachusetts Naval Militia.  In late April 1917 CHICAGO reported to Submarine Force, Atlantic (COMSUBLANT) as flagship in New London, Connecticut, commanded by future Admiral Thomas C. Hart.  On July 10, 1919 she departed New York to join Cruiser Division 2 (CruDiv 2) as flagship of the Pacific.  She was reclassified CA-14 in 1920 and then CL-14 in 1921.  From December 1919 – September 1923, she served with SubDiv 14 and as tender at the Submarine Base, Pearl Harbor.

CHICAGO  was decommissioned at Pearl Harbor on September 30, 1923.  She foundered in the mid-Pacific on July 8, 1936 while being towed from Honolulu to San Francisco.


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1.80  IDENTIFIED AMERICAN SHIP PAINTING.  Late 1800's oil on milkglass ship's portrait of the passenger ship "S.S. MASSACHUSETTS – NEW YORK" as boldly entitled on the prominent ship's lifering.  This colorful rendering depicts the 4-masted vessel underway at sea from a starboard beam perspective.  The ship prominently displays the British flag from the foremast and the American flag at the stern.  The unique presentation consists of a lifering encircling the portrait backed by 2 crossed ship masts.  One bears the United States ensign and the other is the handsome Atlantic Transport Company's house flag (also seen flying from the mainmast in the painting).  It is indistinctively signed lower right "H. Brown."  Housed in a lovely dark wooden frame with ornate gilt liner.  The painting measures 11 by 13 inches sight.  The frame is 15 ¼ by 17 inches.  Outstanding original condition in all respects!  A rare incredibly vibrant painting 130 years old by a listed artist!  Priced to sell.  975 Special Packaging

The S.S. MASSACHUSETTS was built by the famous ship building company Harland & Wolff, Belfast, Ireland (of TITANIC fame) and was launched on December 17, 1891.  After a brief career as a merchant, she was purchased by the U.S. Army Quartermaster Department on July 14, 1898, intended for the U.S. Army Transport Service during the Spanish-American War.  She was commissioned USAT SHERIDAN on January 9, 1899 and home ported at Fort Mason, California.  After her participation in the North Atlantic in World War I, she was scrapped in October 1923 in San Francisco.

Harrison Bird Brown was born in Portland, Maine in 1831.  As a young man he worked for Forbes and Wilson, house and ship painters.  In 1852 he opened his own shop "H.B. Brown Banner and Ornamental Painter."  He also taught painting.  In 1892 (the date of this painting) he moved to England.  He died in 1915.  His works are exhibited in the National Academy, the Peabody Museum and the Portland Museum of Art, Portland, Maine.  (Dorothy Brewington, Dictionary of Marine Artists,"1982, Mystic Seaport Museum.)



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1.29  MINIATURE PORTRAIT ON IVORY.  Absolutely exquisite 18th century portrait miniature painting of a very lovely young woman dressed in her finery in a very suggestive portrait for its time.  This detailed rendering features a beautifully detailed oval portrait executed in the most detailed manner.  The subtle features of her face, hair and drapery are of the highest order adding to the realism of this form of lifelike portrayal of the elite, who could afford it, prior to the advent of photography in the 1830's.  The image is signed lower right "Server," possibly French.  It is housed under convex beveled glass in its ornate gilded oval frame measuring 2 ½ by 3 1/8 inches.  The top back is equipped with a small pivoting suspension ring for hanging.  A tremendous bargain!  Was $895 NOW! 295 


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1.79  ANTIQUE AMERICAN PAINTING.  Original watercolor by well-listed American artist C. W. Hoffman depicting a calm, very pleasing coastal scene in New England.  It is signed lower left "Hoffman."  The colors are strong and the medium is in good condition, noting a couple of imperceptible tears on the periphery which have been addressed.   Very slight toning to the paper, expected of a painting in this medium over 160 years old!  It retains its original heavy gold mat under glass in its original simple gilt wood frame with beaded edge -- all in excellent original condition.   11 ¼ by 23 ¼ inches sight.  19 1/4 by 31 1/4 inches overall.  The back retains its original pine board backing typical of that era.  To preserve the adverse effects of such mounting, an impervious barrier has been professionally installed to strengthen the medium while retaining the overall originality.  Because it is large and under glass, there will be an additional packing charge at our cost to assure it is safely delivered to you.  The UPS Store would charge $200.  Was $995 NOW! 195  Special Packaging


C. W. Hoffman is a listed watercolorist active 1859.  (William Young, "A Dictionary of American Artists, Sculptors and Engravers," 1968, Arno Press, Inc.)



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1.78  RARE DOCUMENTED RESCUE PAINTING.  Antonio Jacobsen, Danish-American (1850-1921), 1893, oil on canvas depicting the rescue of the crew of the Norwegian 3-masterd barque LADY LISCARD by the steam-sail ship MOHICAN.  This dynamic, action-packed oil on canvas rendering shows the two vessels in tumultuous storm-tossed seas.  The LADY LISCARD has been totally dismasted in the storm and its hapless crewmen anxiously await on deck their rescue by the MOHICAN's life boat approaching under oars through gigantic waves.  A really harrowing scene! One crewman is actually shown in the water, pulled to safety in a life ring.  Execution of this painting is of the highest order done by Jacobsen during his most productive and flourishing heyday 1880 - 1895.  The details here are notably better than almost all of his extensvie works.  The dramatic life or death subject matter is unique.  This painting measures 35 ½ by 21 ¾ inches sight and is mounted in a period ornate gilt frame with gold liner measuring 42 ½ by 28 ¾ inches.  Excellent cosmetic condition.  The painting has been professionally relined on its original stretcher.  Inspection under black light reveals numerous tiny touch-ups but no major restoration or repair.  Easily a $10,000 example of this most famous American marine artitist's output. Bargained priced.  5850 Special Packaging

A label attached to the stretcher bar reads:
"From Lloyd's Registers                              P.130
Mohican – 2728 tons, 300.0 feet length, 41.1 feet br.,
19.0 feet depth.  Built 1892 by J.L. Thompson & Son, Sunderland.
Owners "Manhasset" S.S. Co. (Lim.) Registered Liverpool.
Lady Liscard – 1290 tons, 202.0 feet length, 38.0 br.,
23.6 feet depth, Built as a bark 1871 by Baldwin of Quebec.  Home port, Fredrikstad,
Norway.  Unlisted in Lloyd's 1894
ie. lost 1893"

This very painting is listed on pages 204 and 205 of Harold Sniffen's monumental work "Antonio Jacobsen The Checklist," 1984 by the Smith Gallery, New York.  The entry reads, "18. MOHICAN, Scw, Flag Br, Date 1892-1894, Builder Thompson & Sons, Sunderland, Owner T. Hogan & Sons, Homeport Liverpool, Dimensions 300.0 x 41.1x 19.0, 2778 tons, Medium Oil on Canvas Starboard, 22 x 33 inches, Owner Private Collection New York, Shows rescuing the crew from Lady LISCARD."



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1.77  SHIP’s PORTRAIT.  Solon Francis Montecello Badger, American (1873-1919), oil on canvas, the 3-masted schooner Isabel B. Wiley sailing past Portland Head light, Cape Elizabeth, Maine.  Signed and dated lower left “S.F.M. BADGER 12,” and inverso boldly signed “S.F.M. Badger Charleston Mass. 1912.”  This classic broadside ship’s portrait depicts the lovely vessel on her port beam under full sail heading south backed by rocky headlands and a lighthouse in the distance.  Five crewmen are depicted on deck, including the helmsman and the Captain on the poop pointing the way.  The ship is clearly identified in three places:  on the port bow, the port quarter, and on the huge name pennant flown from the spanker mast.  She flies the house flag of Drake & Son (a “D” within a white star) from the mainmast, and the Union Jack from the foremast.  The American ensign flies from the spanker boom.  The detail that Badger lavished on this painting is simply astounding!  It literally bears scrutiny under magnification.  The crispness of lines in close proximity defies description.  Seeing is believing.  Deck detail, rigging and sails are all depicted in what quite frankly could be described as “unrealistic detail.”  22 by 36 inches sight mounted on its original stretcher.  Housed in a period fancy gessoed from marked “Made In U.S.A.” measuring 26 ¼ by 40 ¼ inches overall. This painting is in absolutely untouched original condition front and back.  Close inspection under UV light shows no inpainting, no losses and no damage.  In short this painting is in the same condition left Mr. Badger’s easel 108 years ago!  A more pristine original example is not to be found. Price RequestSpecial Packaging

The Isabel B. Wiley was a wooden hulled 3-masted schooner built by the New England Shipbuilding Company, Bath, Maine in 1906.  She was 160 feet long and displaced 779 tons, under the ownership of J.B. Drake & Son, Bath, Maine.  Ownership was transferred to the Atlas Shipping Company of Philadelphia in the teens. 
In the early morning of June 2, 1918 while sailing off of Barnegat, New Jersey en route from Perth Amboy to Hampton Roads, Virginia a German U-Boat was spotted off her stern.  The hostile submarine fired one shot at the unarmed vessel with its deck gun.  With no hope of outrunning the submarine Wiley's Captain Thomason ordered his crew to abandon ship in the life boats.  Once he and his crew were evacuated the Germans boarded Wiley and set charges which quickly sent her to the bottom.  On what was to become known as “Black Sunday” Wiley was the first of 5 ships sunk that day by German submarine U-151 under the command of Heinrich von Nostitz.  The Wiley's crew was taken aboard the U-Boat, joining the captive crews of the Hauppauge, Edna and Hattie Dunn, where they spent the next 8 days as prisoners. The Americans were finally set adrift in a lifeboat from the previously sunken vessel Winneconne and were given sufficient food and water for three days.

The Isabel B. Wiley now lies in 225 feet of water 58 miles off the coast of Barnegat Inlet, New Jersey and is a recognized deepwater dive site.



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1.74 HISTORIC PAINTING. Rare, original oil on canvas rendering of the entrance to San Diego Bay in the late 1800’s by listed artist H. Slade as signed lower right, “A. H. Slade 1894.” This handsome composition was painted from real life on the easel of the artist at the shore of the Silver Strand, Coronado near the famous Hotel Del Coronado. It depicts the busy channel traffic into and out of San Diego Bay. The vessels are both steam and sail, indicative of craft during that unique, brief transitional time in maritime history. The artist has effectively captured the serenity of the rolling waves curling onto the sands with the ubiquitous yellow kelp washed up on the beach – a sight confirmed by any San Diegan beachgoer to this day! Charmingly, the landmark Point Loma Lighthouse (sometime referred to then as the “Old Spanish Light”) California’s first lighthouse, erected in 1855, is depicted atop the distinctive Point Loma peninsula. This painting measures 18 by 36 inches sight and is housed in a lovely period ornate gilt frame measuring 24 by 42 inches. It has been professionally cleaned and relined with minimal inpainting. It presents very well with bright colors and sharp detail. Included is a later engraved brass identification plaque not attached to the frame.  Price Request Special Packaging

Albert Horatio Slade (1843-1922) was born in England. He had a photography and art studio in Toronto, Canada before moving to San Diego in 1887. "The few examples of his extant work are from the brush of a hihly competent painter. His watercolors and oils are executed in a realistic style similar to that of the Hudson River School painters.") Edan Hughes, "Artists of California 1786-1940"). Slade's extant works are rare.



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1.73 EARLY 18th CENTURY ETCHING. Original, beautifully hand-colored etching by Francois Halma, dating circa 1706. It features a golden medallion depicting the Emperor Constantine flanked by two admiring puti. On either side are a woman in Roman dress and a helmeted warier with plumage and a spear. They are on either side of a grand battle scene entitled “IN HOC SIGNOVINCES.” Below are some thick bound volumes and a cartouche of a morbid figure. This images no doubt have some symbolic significance. At the lower left is the faint image appearing to be a conjoined “ID.” This etching is on early rag paper and bears the telltale plate mark on its edges. It measures 3 ½ x 5 inches sight. On the back is the certificate of authentication by ANTIUQUARIA SANT ANGELO of Rome, Italy. Condition is excellent. The colors are vibrant and the paper is perfect. Mounted is a simple acid free black mat measuring 7 ½ by 7 ½ inches. An amazing image over 300 years old! 99



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1.72 EARLY AMERICA’s CUP LITHOGRAPH. This is perhaps the holy grail of America’s Cup collectibles. This authentic hand-colored stone lithograph is entitled lower center:

“THE “AMERICA”
WINNING THE MATCH AT COWES FOR THE CLUB CUP.
open to Yachts of all Classes and Nations. August 22nd, 1851
From The original Sketch Taken On The Spot By OWSWALD W. BRIERLY.”

In this action-packed scene the artist depicts the triumphant vessel with her crew members on deck taking in the scene of spectator yachts, steamers and small craft, one of which is in the foreground. The AMERICA is shown flying the Union Jack Burgee from her mainmast. This is an original stone lithograph, the same as done by the very well-known American lithographers Currier & Eves, in their earliest days of production. Substantiating its authenticity it has a plate mark on the periphery of the image which proves is not photographic reproduction. An earlier type-written history entitled “The yacht AMERICA” is attached to the back. The image size is 19 ½ inches by 29 ½ inches. The simple wooden frame measures 22 ½ by 32 ½ inches. Framing under non-glare uv glass was done by the owner’s father in the 1960’s. Good original condition noting expected foxing and toning of paper this old. 895 Special Packaging



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1.24 FAMOUS YACHT PAINTING. John Hughes, British-American, (1806-1878) (attrib.) oil on artist's board of the most famous racing yacht of them all, the Yacht AMERICA. This dramatic rendering depicts the schooner AMERICA under full sail slicing through waves with spray in a stiff breeze on a port tack. She flies the American ensign from the spanker and at least seven crewmen are visible on deck. The painter has captured the instant in time with realistic detail down to the mast hoops, reefing lines and decorated billet. The scene is an open ocean yacht race with 3 other yachts on similar tacks and a 3-masted bark in the far distance. Painted at the peak of Hughes' career, this painting very possibly it is THE Royal Yacht Squadron's Regatta in which AMERICA won the America's Cup in 1851. It measures 17 1/2 by 11 1/2 inches and is housed in a magnificent period antique gilt gesso frame measuring 27 1/4 by 21 inches. Outstanding condition in all respects. SOLD

To those familiar with yachting history the AMERICA needs no introduction. AMERICA's genesis was sparked by an invitation from the Royal Yacht Squadron in England for an American vessel to participate in the Great Exhibition. Under Prince Albert's guidance, the exhibition was to be the first World's Fair up to that time. New York Yacht Club Commodore John C. Stevens took up the call and set about to build the "fastest yacht afloat." Stevens gathered a syndicate including Edwin Schuyler, J. Beekman Findlay and Hamilton Wilkes. They commissioned yacht designer George Steers, then working at the yard of William Brown on the East River in New York. What they created was a yacht with clipper bow, sharp forebody and a broad beam of 23 feet well aft. With a registered length of 93 1/2 feet and an 81 foot main mast, the yacht displaced 170 tons. Launched on May 3, 1851, to the most critical American eye she had particular grace. However when the tradition-steeped British builders first saw her they were horrified!

AMERICA arrived in British waters in July, however no races had been planned and no serious British challenges offered. Almost as an afterthought AMERICA's skipper, Richard Brown, suggested that his yacht be entered in the Royal Yacht Squadron's regatta race around the Isle of Wight for an "ordinary cup" worth one hundred guineas. The day of the race, Queen Victoria herself, aboard her yacht VICTORIA AND ALBERT was on hand to view the spectacle. 18 yachts were entered into the race. On board AMERICA, were 21 men including a local pilot.

At the start of the race AMERICA was last to get underway, but as the yachts reached The Needles for the run home a signalman on the Royal Yacht reported sighting the AMERICA. "Oh, indeed! And which is second?" was the Queen's query. As the signalman again swept the horizon with his spyglass, with a quivering voice he announced, "I regret to inform Her Majesty there is no second." As it turns out of course, there was a second, the gallant little yacht AURORA. But she was so far behind that the actual time of her crossing the finish remains unclear. The London Illustrated News reported a lapse of 21 minutes. Some 20 years after the race the New York Yacht Club accepted 8 minutes as the official figure.

It was a Yankee victory and a notable one which was to profoundly shake British yachting circles for decades to come. The "Aulde Cup" as it came to be known and later, popularly, the "America's Cup," found a home in the New York Yacht Club for the next 132 years!


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1.69  SHIP’s PORTRAIT.   A very handsome and colorful portrait of the steam screw freighter “S.S. TRIPP” steaming in Naples Harbor as smoke wafts from the iconic Mount Vesuvius in the background.  With artistic aplomb, sailboats are depicted off its bow.  This well-executed painting exhibits wonderful deck details as well as depicting crewmen at various work stations on deck and on the bridge.   It is identified in 3 places:   the nameboard on the pilot house, on the bow and lower center “S.S. TRIPP.”   This watercolor on artist’s paper is expertly done and is in unusually fine, bright condition for its age.  It measures 18 1/2 by 27 inches sight and is housed in its original simple wooden frame with gilded boarder and acid free mat.  Shipping with glass is optional, but not recommended.  23 by 31 ½ inches.   949  Special Packaging

S.S. TRIPP was launched by the Northwest Steel Company of Portland, Oregon on September 30, 1919 for service in the United States Shipping Board during the waning days of the First World War.  She had a call sign of LRPQ, as shown on her flaghoist.  The ship was 409.8 feet in length,  a breadth of 54.2 feet and a depth of 27.7 feet, displacing 5,703 gross tons (3,513 net).  Her crew of 44 was operated for the U.S.S.B. by Lykes Brothers Steamship Corporation of San Francisco.   Her homeport was Galveston, Texas.

In this early portrait the ship is shown flying the distinctive U.S. Shipping Board flag from her after mast.  The United States Shipping Board (USSB) was established in September 1916 and implemented in January 1917 as the Great War in Europe summoned American involvement.  No doubt the new spic and  span ship was on her maiden voyage to Europe when this portrait was painted in Naples, Italy in late 1919 -- nearly 100 years ago.

Interestingly, in her later life TRIPP was transferred to the French government and renamed  ILE DE NOIRMOUTIER thence controlled by the Nazis.  On November 8, 1942 she was liberated by Allied forces in Casablanca and ultimately returned to France after VE Day in 1945. 



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1.14 PAINTING. Important, large and impressive marine painting by the famed ship artist Antonio Nicolo Gasparo Jacobsen (Danish-American, 1850-1921). This spectacular oil on canvas painting depicts the graceful steam/auxilliary sail passenger ship APACHE underway at sea. In a portside ship's portrait Jacobsen has captured the essence of this well known vessel in a fresh breeze with sails furled and name pennant, house flag and American ensign flying. As the ship plies choppy deep green seas, puffy cumulus clouds punctuate the azure sky while wisps of smoke and steam spill from the large solitary smoke stack. This especially pleasing rendering is boldly signed lower right "Antonio Jacobsen/Palisade Av. Division St./West Hoboken, NJ" and dates to 1904. It is housed in a simple wooden frame with gold liner measuring 35 by 55 inches. The painting itself measures 30 by 50 inches sight and is on its original wooden stretcher. It has just been professionally cleaned and relined. There is very little inpainting in evidence under ultraviolet light. What little there is consists of a few small areas in the sky only. There is no retouching to the vessel itself. Excellent, ready to display condition. Price Request Special Packaging

The much heralded steam/sail passenger ship APACHE was launched by William Cramp & Son Shipbuilders, Philadelphia, PA in 1901. She was successfully operated by the Clyde Steamship Company out of her home port of New York during a profitable career which spanned 27 years.

Literature:

Harold Sniffen, "ANTONIO JACOBSEN The Chesklist," 1984, The Mariner's Museum, Newport News, VA, pages 32-33, item number 31. Dated 1904.
Harold Sniffen, "Painted Ships on Painted Oceans," The Mariner's Museum, Newport News, Virginia, 1994, full page color photograph page 133.

 



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1.68   PAINTING.   Genuine, highly sought after, mid-19th century oil on canvas port painting of the American clippership R. B. FULLER making its approaches to Hong Kong.  This classic China Trade ship’s portrait shows a starboard broadside view of the true clipper under full sail with only the   mizzen furled as she sails into port.  A number of crewmen are depicted on deck ready to take in sail on the captain’s orders.  The ship prominently flies the name pennant “R. B. FULLER” from the main mast and the American ensign from the spanker boom aft.  Deck details are clearly visible as are the gold trailboard along the bow and the ship’s nameboard.  In the background loom the famous hills of Hong Kong Harbor lined with quaint buildings, while the harbor is full of busy sailing vessels including the old hulk of a prison ship.  Just astern of the FULLER is a nicely rendered Chinese junk.  This predominantly deep blue painting is accentuated by the contrasty white sails of the clippership, making for a most dramatic presentation.  The pristine canvas is NOT relined and is mounted on its original old wooden stretcher.  It measures 17 ½ by 21 ½ inches sight and is housed in its very handsome antique gilt gessoed frame measuring 24 by 32 inches.  The painting is in remarkably untouched original condition.  Ready to hang.  Guaranteed to be of the period and at least 150 years old!  Museum quality.  Price Request Special Packaging



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1.66  SHIP’s PORTRAIT.   Solon Francis Montecello Badger, American, 19th century, oil on canvas paining of the American 4-masted schooner “ESTELLE PHINNEY” as prominently noted on the quarterboard, name pennant and stern quarter board.   It is signed, lower left, “S.F.M. Badger 98.” This comprehensive work depicts the lovely vessel under full sail at sea with the coast and a prominent lighthouse in the background.  Nine men are shown at various work stations on deck.  Execution is extremely fine, including the foc'sle capstan, foredeck house with Charlie Nobel, 2 mid-deck hatches, midships deck house, after cargo hatch, aft deck house with skylights, helm, steering gear box and the ship’s lifeboat suspended on davits over the stern.   She flies the Union Jack from the foremast, the ship’s flag “EP” from the mizzen, the ship’s name pennant from the main and the American ensign from the aftermast.  On the poop deck the Captain can be seen pointing forward with helmsman at the wheel.  It is obvious from the minute details depicted in this work  the artist painted “from life” rather than from sketches or a photograph.   Much more detail than the typical Jacobsen!  The painting is clean and bright.  The colors are rich and all lines are crisp including scores of subtle reefing lines on the sails.  It measures 24 by 40 inches sight and is housed in a magnificent period gilted gesso wooden frame 34 ½ by 48 ½ inches. SOLD

Solon Francis Montecello Badger was born in Boston in 1873 and grew up in neighboring Charleston, Massachusetts.   As a teenager he lodged with and was apprenticed to the well known Maine ship portrait painter William P. Stubbs.  In his early 20’s Badger took up ship painting, sailing around Boston Harbor in a small craft seeking commissions for his art from ship owners in that busy port.  As a result, his works reflect meticulous attention to detail required of him to “get it right” for his demanding sea borne clientele.  To these ends, sometimes he even worked from blueprints!  Badger died at the relatively young age of 46.  As his artwork gained notoriety after his death, he was known by the misnomer "Samuel Finley Morse Badger."  The unknown reason for this name discrepancy was only corrected a few years ago.  Museums exhibiting his work include the Maine Maritime Museum, Peabody Essex Museum, Mystic Seaport Museum and the Mariners’ Museum.
The date on this work, “98,” indicates Badger was only 25 years of age in 1898 when he completed this painting.
The 4-masted schooner ESTELLE PHINNEY  with call sign K.J.S.M.,  was a wooden hulled ship 189 feet in length displacing 923 tons.  She was built in New London, Connecticut in 1891 and homeported in New Haven.  (“List of Merchant Vessels of the United State 1899.”)  Shown here, she is sailing south off the coast of Scituate, Massachusetts with the famous Minot’s Ledge lighthouse in the background.



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1.40  IMPORTANT MINIATURE PORTRAIT.  Genuine 18th century Continental oil on ivory portrait miniature of a stately nobleman identified on the reverse in beautiful hand-written script as the "Barone Massimiliouro De Flercles."  This handsome young gentleman with lace collar is dressed in typical 18th C. finery.  Probably of Belgium origin.  An extremely well done miniature which bears close scrutiny under the most powerful magnification!  Housed in its original gilt metal frame 2 by 2 1/4 inches. Superb, untouched original condition.  695

Preceding the advent of the Daguerreotype, the first form of photography introduced in 1839, portrait miniatures such as this example, were the only means by which wealthy patrons could insure that their likenesses were preserved for posterity.


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1.34  PAINTING.  William Pierce Stubbs, American, 19th century, oil on canvas, ship’s portrait of the 3-masted schooner MORRIS W. CHILD.  This original large format rendering  depicts the vessel in a port side view at sea under full sail.  An island with lighthouse is shown on the left, while a steamer is visible on the horizon to the right.  The handsome schooner flies the Union Jack from the foremast, the owner’s flag from the main, a colorful swallow tail name pennant from the mizzen and the American ensign from the spanker aft.  The artist has lavished particular care in portraying the complex rigging as well as deck details, including crewman about their chores amidships and on the poop.  This painting measures 22 by 36 inches sight and is housed in its original ornate gilt gesso frame measuring 32 ¼ by 46 ¼ inches.   It is signed lower left, “W. P. Stubbs.”   Condition is excellent.  The painting has been professionally cleaned and relined, retaining all of its original color, brightness and detail.  The ornate frame with floral designs has been fully restored.  According to a label on the reverse this work was performed by Fynmore Studios, Boonville, N.Y. in April 1973.  Examination under black light shows modest inpainting, primarily in the sky and on the periphery due to stretcher bar wear, as expected of oil on canvas paintings over 100 years old. SOLD

The 3-masted schooner MORRIS W. CHILD, official number 91311, call sign J.V.F.L., was built in Bath, Maine by H. M. Bean in 1881.  She had a length of 145 feet, a breadth of 34 feet, a draft of 12 ½ feet and displaced 513 gross tons.  As of 1885 her master was Captain Torrey and her owners were J.P. Ellicot and Company, homeported in Boston, Massachusetts.  (“The Record of American & Foreign Shipping,” 1885, American Shipmasters’ Association).

William Pierce Stubbs was born in Bucksport, Maine in 1842 to the son of Captain Reuben Stubbs.  In 1876 he was listed in the Boston directories as a painter, and in 1877 as a marine artist.  He exhibited at the International Maritime Exhibition of Boston in 1890.  He died May 15, 1909.  His works are displayed in the Boston Historical Society, Maine Maritime Museum, Peabody Museum, Mystic Seaport Museum, Old State House Bostonian Society, Penobscot Marine Museum, Beverly Historical Society Massachusetts, Sailor’s Snug Harbor New York and the Smithsonian Institution.

Provenance:   This is one of three ship’s portraits of the 3-masted schooner MORRIS W. CHILDS commissioned of Stubbs by the Ellicot family, owners of the vessel.  By decent, it is the last to leave family hands.


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